Oxmoor Page Turners (OPT) Book Club

Join our evening book group as we engage in lively discussion and enjoy light refreshments!
 

We meet:

Second Tuesday of the month
6:30 - 8pm
Lucretia M. Somers Boardroom

 

Here are our 2014 selections. Reserve them by clicking the links below:

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

Tuesday, August 12,at 6:30 p.m. in the Boardroom
 

Mark Haddon's bitterly funny debut novel, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, is a murder mystery of sorts--one told by autistic fifteen-year-old Christopher John Francis Boone is mathematically gifted and socially hopeless, raised in a working-class home by parents who can barely cope with their child's quirks. He takes everything that he sees (or is told) at face value, and is unable to sort out the strange behavior of his elders and peers. Late one night, Christopher comes across his neighbor's poodle, Wellington, impaled on a garden fork. ellington's owner finds him cradling her dead dog in his arms, and has him arrested. After spending a night in jail, Christopher resolves--against the objection of his father and neighbors--to discover just who has murdered Wellington. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is original, clever, and genuinely moving: this one is a must-read.

 

 

Man in the Blue Moon by Michael Morris

Birmingham Author Michael Morris Will Be Our Special Guest
Tuesday, September 9, at 6:30 p.m. in the Boardroom
 

Join us as we welcome Michael Morris, award-winning Birmingham author, to our book club.  We will be discussing his latest, Man in the Blue Moon, a magical and mesmerizing page-turner rooted in hardscrabble Florida during WWI, based in part on a true family story. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfeld
Tuesday, October 14, at 6:30 p.m. in the Boardroom
 

Former academic Setterfield pays tributein her debut to Brontë and du Maurier heroines: a plain girl gets wrapped up in a dark, haunted ruin of a house, which guards family secrets that are not hers and that she must discover at her peril. Setterfield has rejuvenated the genre with this closely plotted, clever foray into a world of secrets, confused identities, lies, and half-truths. She never cheats by pulling a rabbit out of a hat; this atmospheric story hangs together perfectly.

 

 

 

 

 

by Karen Abbott   
Tuesday, November 11, at 6:30 p.m. in the Boardroom
 

Karen Abbott illuminates one of the most fascinating yet little known aspects of the Civil War: the stories of four courageous women—a socialite, a farm girl, an abolitionist, and a widow—who were spies. Using a wealth of primary source material and interviews with the spies’ descendants, Abbott seamlessly weaves the adventures of these four heroines throughout the tumultuous years of the war. With a cast of real-life characters including Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, General Stonewall Jackson, detective Allan Pinkerton, Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln, and Emperor Napoleon III, Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy draws you into the war as these daring women lived it.

 

 

Tuesday, December 9, at 6:30 p.m. in the Boardroom
 

Aging daughter of the South Sookie Simmons Poole has trudged along cheerfully through life under the shadow of her overbearing mother, Lenore. Faced with empty-nest syndrome, Sookie knows she won’t be too bored, since Lenore lives right next door and still has her mail delivered to Sookie’s house. When a mysterious letter arrives, Sookie questions everything she ever knew about her family, and her story soon dovetails with that of a proud Polish family from Wisconsin. The Jurdabralinskis’ gas station was nearly shuttered when all the area men joined up during WWII, but the family’s four girls bravely stepped up. Eldest daughter Fritzi was already a great mechanic, having been a professional stunt plane pilot in the 1930s. When Fritzi joins the WASPS, an elite but downplayed female branch of the U.S. Air Force, the story really comes to life. Flagg’s storytelling talent is on full display. Her trademark quirky characters are warm and realistic, and the narrative switches easily between the present and the past.

 

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Tuesday, January 13, at 6:30 p.m. in the Boardroom
 

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.  Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars is award-winning-author John Green’s most ambitious and heartbreaking work yet, brilliantly exploring the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love.

 

 

 

Loving Frank by Nancy Horan
Tuesday, February , at 6:30 p.m. in the Boardroom
 

It's a rare treasure to find a historically imagined novel that is at once fully versed in the facts and unafraid of weaving those truths into a story that dares to explore the unanswered questions. Frank Lloyd Wright and Mamah Cheney's love story is--as many early reviews of Loving Frank have noted--little-known and often dismissed as scandal. In Nancy Horan's skillful hands, however, what you get is two fully realized people, entirely, irrepressibly, in love. Loving Frank is a remarkable literary achievement, tenderly acute and even-handed in even the most heartbreaking moments, and an auspicious debut from a writer to watch.

 

 

Come and share our love of books!

For more information, phone 205.332.6620 or email Leslie West.