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Current Weather Conditions In Birmingham, AL

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Sunny, and 92 ° F. For more details?

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This map shows the location and intensity of precipitation in your area. The color of the precipitation corresponds to the rate at which it is falling. This map is updated every 15 minutes.

Pollen Trend for Birmingham, AL

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Steady. View complete PollenCast?

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Your Weekend Forecast For Birmingham, AL

Weather - 2 hours 14 min ago
Chance of Precipitation: Fri: 0% / Sat: 80% / Sun: 80%. For complete forecast details...

Your 10-Day Forecast for Birmingham, AL

Weather - 2 hours 14 min ago
Today: & High null°F / Low 67°F.--- Fri: Partly Cloudy & High 94°F / Low 72°F.--- Sat: T-Storms & High 87°F / Low 71°F.--- Sun: & Beyond.... For more details?

Alabama Launchpad and the BBA team-up to offer workshop on federal research funding

Technology News - 2 hours 20 min ago
Alabama Launchpad (a project of the Economic Development Partnership of Alabama) and the Birmingham Business Alliance have teamed-up to offer a workshop for researchers all over Alabama to secure a piece of the $2 billion awarded annually to qualified applicants all over the country. IanHoppe http://connect.al.com/user/IanHoppe/index.html

September Book Club Book: Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline


Regular meeting of the Monday Night Book Club will be Monday, September 8th, at 6:00 p.m.
The author of Bird in Hand and The Way Life Should Be delivers her most ambitious and powerful novel to date: a captivating story of two very different women who build an unexpected friendship: a 91-year-old woman with a hidden past as an orphan-train rider and the teenage girl whose own troubled adolescence leads her to seek answers to questions no one has ever thought to ask.

Nearly eighteen, Molly Ayer knows she has one last chance. Just months from "aging out" of the child welfare system, and close to being kicked out of her foster home, a community service position helping an elderly woman clean out her home is the only thing keeping her out of juvie and worse.

Vivian Daly has lived a quiet life on the coast of Maine. But in her attic, hidden in trunks, are vestiges of a turbulent past. As she helps Vivian sort through her possessions and memories, Molly discovers that she and Vivian aren't as different as they seem to be. A young Irish immigrant orphaned in New York City, Vivian was put on a train to the Midwest with hundreds of other children whose destinies would be determined by luck and chance.

The closer Molly grows to Vivian, the more she discovers parallels to her own life. A Penobscot Indian, she, too, is an outsider being raised by strangers, and she, too, has unanswered questions about the past. As her emotional barriers begin to crumble, Molly discovers that she has the power to help Vivian find answers to mysteries that have haunted her for her entire life - answers that will ultimately free them both.

Rich in detail and epic in scope, Orphan Train is a powerful novel of upheaval and resilience, of second chances, of unexpected friendship, and of the secrets we carry that keep us from finding out who we are.

Nail polish aims to curb date-rape, critics say it ignores the issue

Technology News - 3 hours 30 min ago
A new nail polish aims to help prevent date-rape, but what message does it send? Cassie Fambro | cfambro@al.com http://connect.al.com/user/CassieFambro/index.html

Today is national Ghostbusters day. Where is your Proton Pack?

Technology News - 4 hours 50 min ago
If it felt like the 80s when you got out of bed this morning, that's because the ghosts of summers past have come back to haunt you. But I ain't afraid of no ghost. IanHoppe http://connect.al.com/user/IanHoppe/index.html

Current Weather Conditions In Birmingham, AL

Weather - 5 hours 14 min ago
Sunny, and 90 ° F. For more details?

Your Local Doppler Radar

Weather - 5 hours 14 min ago
This map shows the location and intensity of precipitation in your area. The color of the precipitation corresponds to the rate at which it is falling. This map is updated every 15 minutes.

Pollen Trend for Birmingham, AL

Weather - 5 hours 14 min ago
Steady. View complete PollenCast?

Video: Your Regional Weather Forecast

Weather - 5 hours 14 min ago
Watch what the experts at The Weather Channel® have to say about the weather trends in your area.

ADV: Upgrade to weather.com Gold!

Weather - 5 hours 14 min ago
Get advanced storm tracking maps and weather for 10 cities in one-click, all with no ads! Start your free trial now.

Your Weekend Forecast For Birmingham, AL

Weather - 5 hours 14 min ago
Chance of Precipitation: Fri: 0% / Sat: 90% / Sun: 50%. For complete forecast details...

Your 10-Day Forecast for Birmingham, AL

Weather - 5 hours 14 min ago
Today: Partly Cloudy & High 93°F / Low 68°F.--- Fri: Mostly Sunny & High 95°F / Low 72°F.--- Sat: T-Storms & High 87°F / Low 72°F.--- Sun: & Beyond.... For more details?

World War II


American Experience: Fly Girls (documentary film)
(Amazon.com) During WWII, more than a thousand women signed up to fly with the U.S. military. Wives, mothers, actresses and debutantes who joined the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPS) test-piloted aircraft, ferried planes and logged 60 million miles in the air. Thirty-eight women died in service. But the opportunity to play a critical role in the war effort was abruptly canceled by politics and resentment, and it would be 30 years before women would again break the sex barrier in the skies.

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein
(Powells.com) Oct. 11th, 1943 — A British spy plane crashes in Nazi-occupied France. Its pilot and passenger are best friends. One of the girls has a chance at survival. The other has lost the game before it's barely begun.
When “Verity” is arrested by the Gestapo, she's sure she doesn't stand a chance. As a secret agent captured in enemy territory, she's living a spy's worst nightmare. Her Nazi interrogators give her a simple choice: reveal her mission or face a grisly execution.
As she intricately weaves her confession, Verity uncovers her past, how she became friends with the pilot Maddie, and why she left Maddie in the wrecked fuselage of their plane. On each new scrap of paper, Verity battles for her life, confronting her views on courage, failure and her desperate hope to make it home. But will trading her secrets be enough to save her from the enemy?
A Michael L. Printz Award Honor book that was called “a fiendishly-plotted mind game of a novel” in The New York Times, Code Name Verity is a visceral read of danger, resolve, and survival that shows just how far true friends will go to save each other.

City of Thieves by David Benioff
(Powells.com)  As wise and funny as it is thrilling and original — the story of two young men on an impossible adventure.
A writer visits his retired grandparents in Florida to document their experience during the infamous siege of Leningrad. His grandmother won't talk about it, but his grandfather reluctantly consents. The result is the captivating odyssey of two young men trying to survive against desperate odds.Lev Beniov considers himself "built for deprivation." He's small, smart, and insecure, a Jewish virgin too young for the army, who spends his nights working as a volunteer firefighter with friends from his building. 
When a dead German paratrooper lands in his street, Lev is caught looting the body and dragged to jail, fearing for his life. He shares his cell with the charismatic and grandiose Kolya, a handsome young soldier arrested on desertion charges. Instead of the standard bullet in the back of the head, Lev and Kolya are given a shot at saving their own lives by complying with an outrageous directive: secure a dozen eggs for a powerful colonel to use in his daughter's wedding cake. In a city cut off from all supplies and suffering unbelievable deprivation, Lev and Kolya embark on a hunt to find the impossible.
A search that takes them through the dire lawlessness of Leningrad and the devastated surrounding countryside creates an unlikely bond between this earnest, lust-filled teenager and an endearing lothario with the gifts of a conman. Set within the monumental events of history, City of Thieves is an intimate coming-of-age tale with an utterly contemporary feel for how boys become men.

GENERAL DISCUSSION:  Benioff is one of the screenwriters for HBO's adaptation of George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series, Game of Thrones.

The All-Girl Filling Station's Last Reunion by Fannie Flagg
(Powells.com)  The one and only Fannie Flagg, beloved author of Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe, Can’tWait to Get to Heaven, and I Still Dream About You, is at her hilarious and superb best in this new comic mystery novel about two women who are forced to reimagine who they are.
Mrs. Sookie Poole of Point Clear, Alabama, has just married off the last of her daughters and is looking forward to relaxing and perhaps traveling with her husband, Earle. The only thing left to contend with is her mother, the formidable Lenore Simmons Krackenberry. Lenore may be a lot of fun for other people, but is, for the most part, an overbearing presence for her daughter. Then one day, quite by accident, Sookie discovers a secret about her mother’s past that knocks her for a loop and suddenly calls into question everything she ever thought she knew about herself, her family, and her future.
Sookie begins a search for answers that takes her to California, the Midwest, and back in time, to the 1940s, when an irrepressible woman named Fritzi takes on the job of running her family’s filling station. Soon truck drivers are changing their routes to fill up at the All-Girl Filling Station. Then, Fritzi sees an opportunity for an even more groundbreaking adventure. As Sookie learns about the adventures of the girls at the All-Girl Filling Station, she finds herself with new inspiration for her own life.
Fabulous, fun-filled, spanning decades and generations, and centered on a little-known aspect of America’s twentieth-century story, The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion is another irresistible novel by the remarkable Fannie Flagg.

The Postmistress by Sarah Blake
(Powells.com)  Those who carry the truth sometimes bear a terrible burden... Filled with stunning parallels to today's world, The Postmistress is a sweeping novel about the loss of innocence of two extraordinary women — and of two countries torn apart by war.
On the eve of the United States's entrance into World War II in 1940, Iris James, the postmistress of Franklin, a small town on Cape Cod, does the unthinkable: She doesn't deliver a letter.
In London, American radio gal Frankie Bard is working with Edward R. Murrow, reporting on the Blitz. One night in a bomb shelter, she meets a doctor from Cape Cod with a letter in his pocket, a letter Frankie vows to deliver when she returns from Germany and France, where she is to record the stories of war refugees desperately trying to escape.
The residents of Franklin think the war can't touch them- but as Frankie's radio broadcasts air, some know that the war is indeed coming. And when Frankie arrives at their doorstep, the two stories collide in a way no one could have foreseen.
The Postmistress is an unforgettable tale of the secrets we must bear, or bury. It is about what happens to love during war­time, when those we cherish leave. And how every story — of love or war — is about looking left when we should have been looking right.

Hitler's Holy Relics: A True Story of Nazi Plunder and the Race to Recoverthe Crown Jewels of the Holy Roman Empire by Sidney Kirkpatrick
(Powells.com) Had Hitler succeeded in conquering Europe, he would have crowned himself Holy Roman Emperor. The Nazis had in their possession priceless artifacts that would give Hitler legitimacy in his subjects' eyes: the Crown Jewels of the Holy Roman Empire including the Spear of Destiny, alleged to have pierced Christ's side at the Crucifixion.
Looted from the royal treasury in Vienna, Austria, the Crown Jewels were hidden in a secret bunker deep beneath Nürnberg castle, known to few but Heinrich Himmler, his staff--and a captured German soldier whose family lived above it. As luck would have it, the officer in charge of interrogating the soldier was First Lieutenant Walter Horn, art history professor. Following his report to General Patton, Horn would be assigned to recover this ancient treasure. Would he find it before covert Nazi agents could use it to revive the defeated regime?
Based on recently discovered and previously unpublished documents and interviews with all remaining living participants, this is a tale that surpasses fiction: part thriller, part detective story, all true.

The Monuments Men: Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves, and the Greatest TreasureHunt in History by Robert Edsel
(Powells.com) At the same time Adolf Hitler was attempting to take over the western world, his armies were methodically seeking and hoarding the finest art treasures in Europe. The Fuehrer had begun cataloguing the art he planned to collect as well as the art he would destroy: "degenerate" works he despised.
In a race against time, behind enemy lines, often unarmed, a special force of American and British museum directors, curators, art historians, and others, called the Momuments Men, risked their lives scouring Europe to prevent the destruction of thousands of years of culture.
Focusing on the eleven-month period between D-Day and V-E Day, this fascinating account follows six Monuments Men and their impossible mission to save the world's great art from the Nazis.

Once Upon a Town: The Miracle of the North Platte Canteen by Bob Greene(Powells.com) In search of "the best America there ever was," bestselling author and award-winning journalist Bob Greene finds it in a small Nebraska town few people pass through today; a town where Greene discovers the echoes of the most touching love story imaginable: a love story between a country and its sons.
During World War II, American soldiers from every city and walk of life rolled through North Platte, Nebraska, on troop trains en route to their ultimate destinations in Europe and the Pacific. The tiny town, wanting to offer the servicemen warmth and support, transformed its modest railroad depot into the North Platte Canteen.
Every day of the year, every day of the war, the Canteen, staffed and funded entirely by local volunteers, was open from five a.m. until the last troop train of the day pulled away after midnight. Astonishingly, this remote plains community of only 12,000 people provided welcoming words, friendship, and baskets of food and treats to more than six million GIs by the time the war ended.In this poignant and heartwarming eyewitness history, based on interviews with North Platte residents and the soldiers who once passed through, Bob Greene tells a classic, lost-in-the-mists-of-time American story of a grateful country honoring its brave and dedicated sons.

Pure Grit: How American WWII Nurses Survived Battle and Prison Camp in thePacific by Mary Cronk Farrell
(Powells.com) In the early 1940s, young women enlisted for peacetime duty as U.S. Army nurses. But when the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 blasted the United States into World War II, 101 American Army and Navy nurses serving in the Philippines were suddenly treating wounded and dying soldiers while bombs exploded all around them. The women served in jerry-rigged jungle hospitals on the Bataan Peninsula and in underground tunnels on Corregidor Island. Later, when most of them were captured by the Japanese as prisoners of war, they suffered disease and near-starvation for three years.
Pure Grit is a story of sisterhood and suffering, of tragedy and betrayal, of death and life. The women cared for one another, maintained discipline, and honored their vocation to nurse anyone in need—all 101 coming home alive. The book is illustrated with archival photographs and includes an index, glossary, and timeline.

A Curious Madness: An American Combat Psychiatrist, a Japanese War CrimesSuspect, and an Unsolved Mystery from WWII by Eric Jaffe
(Barnesandnoble.com) In the wake of World War II, the Allied forces charged twenty-eight Japanese men with crimes against humanity. Correspondents at the Tokyo trial thought the evidence fell most heavily on ten of the accused. In December 1948, five of these defendants were hanged, while four received sentences of life in prison. The tenth was a brilliant philosopher-patriot named Okawa Shumei. His story proved strangest of all.
Among all the political and military leaders on trial, Okawa was the lone civilian. In the years leading up to World War II, he had outlined a divine mission for Japan to lead Asia against the West, prophesized a great clash with the United States, planned coups d'etat with military rebels, and financed the assassination of Japan's prime minister. Beyond "all vestiges of doubt," concluded a classified American intelligence report, "Okawa moved in the best circles of nationalist intrigue."Okawa's guilt as a conspirator appeared straightforward. But on the first day of the Tokyo trial, he made headlines around the world by slapping star defendant and wartime prime minister Tojo Hideki on the head. Had Okawa lost his sanity? Or was he faking madness to avoid a grim punishment? A U.S. Army psychiatrist stationed in occupied Japan, Major Daniel Jaffe—the author's grandfather—was assigned to determine Okawa's ability to stand trial, and thus his fate.
Jaffe was no stranger to madness. He had seen it his whole life: in his mother, as a boy in Brooklyn; in soldiers, on the battlefields of Europe. Now his seasoned eye faced the ultimate test. If Jaffe deemed Okawa sane, the war crimes suspect might be hanged. But if Jaffe found Okawa insane, the philosopher patriot might escape justice for his role in promoting Japan's wartime aggression.Meticulously researched, A Curious Madness is both expansive in scope and vivid in detail. As the story pushes both Jaffe and Okawa toward their postwar confrontation, it explores such diverse topics as the roots of belligerent Japanese nationalism, the development of combat psychiatry during World War II, and the complex nature of postwar justice. Eric Jaffe is at his best in this suspenseful and engrossing historical narrative of the fateful intertwining of two men on different sides of the war and the world and the question of insanity.

The Dog Who Could Fly: The Incredible True Story of a WWII Airman and theFour-Legged Hero Who Flew at His Side by Damien Lewis
(Powells.com) An instant hit in the UK, this is the true account of a German shepherd who was adopted by the Royal Air Force during World War II, joined in flight missions, and survived everything from crash-landings to parachute bailouts, ultimately saving the life of his owner and dearest friend.
In the winter of 1939 in the cold snow of no-man's-land, two loners met and began an extraordinary journey that would turn them into lifelong friends. One was an orphaned puppy, abandoned by his owners as they fled Nazi forces. The other was a different kind of lost soul, a Czech airman bound for the Royal Air Force and the country that he would come to call home. Airman Robert Bozdech stumbled across the tiny German shepherd, whom he named Ant, after being shot down on a daring mission over enemy lines. Unable to desert his charge, Robert hid Ant inside his jacket as he escaped. In the months that followed the pair would save each other's lives countless times as they flew together with Bomber Command. And though Ant was eventually grounded due to injury, he refused to abandon his duty, waiting patiently beside the runway for his master's return from every sortie, and refusing food and sleep until they were reunited. 
By the end of the war Robert and Ant had become British war heroes, and Ant was justly awarded the Dickin Medal, which honours the work of animals in war. With beautiful vintage black-and-white photos of Robert and Ant, The Dog Who Could Fly is a deeply moving story of loyalty in the face of adversity and the unshakable bond between a man and his best friend.

Up Front by Bill Mauldin
(Powells.com) "The real war," said Walt Whitman, "will never get in the books." During World War II, the truest glimpse most Americans got of the "real war" came through the flashing black lines of twenty-two-year-old infantry sergeant Bill Mauldin. Week after week, Mauldin defied army censors, German artillery, and Patton's pledge to "throw his ass in jail" to deliver his wildly popular cartoon, "Up Front," to the pages of Stars and Stripes. "Up Front" featured the wise-cracking Willie and Joe, whose stooped shoulders, mud-soaked uniforms, and pidgin of army slang and slum dialect bore eloquent witness to the world of combat and the men who lived'"and died'"in it.
This taut, lushly illustrated biography'"the first of two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Bill Mauldin'"is illustrated with more than ninety classic Mauldin cartoons and rare photographs. It traces the improbable career and tumultuous private life of a charismatic genius who rose to fame on his motto: "If it's big, hit it."

Sage by Colonel Jerry Sage, "Dagger" of the O.S.S. (NOT AVAIL IN THE PLJC SYSTEM)
(books.google.com) A former agent for the O.S.S. during World War II details his capture by the Nazis, his experiences in a POW camp in Germany, his role in the "Great Escape," and his continual escape attempts and harassment of the Nazis. (1993 Obituary in Variety)


GENERAL DISCUSSION: Steve McQueen's charater in the 1963 film "TheGreat Escape" was based on Colonel Sage's experiences.  The DVD special features contain a documentary about the making of the movie, including Colonel Sage's adventures.

Chinese Comfort Women: Testimonies from Imperial Japan's Sex Slaves by Peipei Qiu
(Powells.com) During the Asia-Pacific War, the Japanese military forced hundreds of thousands of women across Asia into "comfort stations" where they were repeatedly raped and tortured. Japanese imperial forces claimed they recruited women to join these stations in order to prevent the mass rape of local women and the spread of venereal disease among soldiers. In reality, these women were kidnapped and coerced into sexual slavery. Comfort stations institutionalized rape, and these "comfort women" were subjected to atrocities that have only recently become the subject of international debate.
Chinese Comfort Women features the personal narratives of twelve women forced into sexual slavery when the Japanese military occupied their hometowns. Beginning with their prewar lives and continuing through their enslavement to their postwar struggles for justice, these interviews reveal that the prolonged suffering of the comfort station survivors was not contained to wartime atrocities but was rather a lifelong condition resulting from various social, political, and cultural factors.
In addition, their stories bring to light several previously hidden aspects of the comfort women system: the ransoms the occupation army forced the victims' families to pay, the various types of improvised comfort stations set up by small military units throughout the battle zones and occupied regions, and the sheer scope of the military sexual slavery-much larger than previously assumed. The personal narratives of these survivors combined with the testimonies of witnesses, investigative reports, and local histories also reveal a correlation between the proliferation of the comfort stations and the progression of Japan's military offensive. The first English-language account of its kind, Chinese Comfort Women exposes the full extent of the injustices suffered by and the conditions that caused them.


Youtube Links:
COMFORT WOMEN WANTED: Art Student Project.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=limEiSjBCGw&list=WL&index=71
Yumiko Yamamoto: Appeals to the UN, "Comfort Women were Not Sex Slaves"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8rd1kXMUM8&list=WL&index=74
GENERAL DISCUSSION: Last week, during a visit to South Korea, Pope Francis met with seven "comfort" women prior to a mass calling for peace and reconciliation between North and South Korea. 


Evil Men by James Dawes
(Powells.com) Presented with accounts of genocide and torture, we ask how people could bring themselves to commit such horrendous acts. A searching meditation on our all-too-human capacity for inhumanity, Evil Men confronts atrocity head-on--how it looks and feels, what motivates it, how it can be stopped.
Drawing on firsthand interviews with convicted war criminals from the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945), James Dawes leads us into the frightening territory where soldiers perpetrated some of the worst crimes imaginable: murder, torture, rape, medical experimentation on living subjects. Transcending conventional reporting and commentary, Dawes's narrative weaves together unforgettable segments from the interviews with consideration of the troubling issues they raise. Telling the personal story of his journey to Japan, Dawes also lays bare the cultural misunderstandings and ethical compromises that at times called the legitimacy of his entire project into question. For this book is not just about the things war criminals do. It is about what it is like, and what it means, to befriend them.
Do our stories of evil deeds make a difference? Can we depict atrocity without sensational curiosity? Anguished and unflinchingly honest, as eloquent as it is raw and painful, Evil Men asks hard questions about the most disturbing capabilities human beings possess, and acknowledges that these questions may have no comforting answers.

YouTube Links, specifically focusing on Unit 731:
Unit 731 - Nightmare in Manchuria (History Channel)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IgtIyNRv3g8&list=WL&index=70
Kizu: The Untold Story Of Unit 731
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IgtIyNRv3g8&list=WL&index=70

The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win WWIIby Denise Kiernan
(Amazon.com) During the height of WWII, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was home to 75,000 residents, consuming more electricity than New York City. But to most of theworld, the town did not exist. Thousands of civilians--many of them young women from small towns across the South--were recruited to this secret city, enticed by solid wages and the promise of war-ending work. Kept very much in the dark, few would ever guess the true nature of the tasks they performed each day in the hulking factories in the middle of the Appalachian Mountains. That is, until the end of the war--when Oak Ridge's secret was revealed.
Drawing on the voices of the women who lived it--women who are now in their eighties and nineties-- The Girls of Atomic City rescues a remarkable, forgotten chapter of American history from obscurity. Denise Kiernan captures the spirit of the times through these women: their pluck, their desire to contribute, and their enduring courage. Combining the grand-scale human drama of The Worst Hard Time with the intimate biography and often troubling science of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, The Girls of Atomic City is a lasting and important addition to our country's history.

YouTube Link: Denise Kiernan Discusses The Girls of Atomic City (San Francisco, CA)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITZZTUeSmDQ&list=WL&index=73

Hiroshima, Nagasaki: The Real Story of the Atomic Bombings and TheirAftermath by Paul Ham
(Amazon.com) In this harrowing history of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, Paul Ham argues against the use of nuclear weapons, drawing on extensive research and hundreds of interviews to prove that the bombings had little impact on the eventual outcome of the Pacific War.

YouTube Link remembering the 69th anniversary of the Hiroshima / Nagasaki bombings: "War Makes Everyone Crazy": Hiroshima Survivor Reflects on 69th Anniversary of U.S. Atomic Bombing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uEd2xgmKlGU&list=UUzuqE7-t13O4NIDYJfakrhw

Top Secret Rosies: The Female Computers of WWII (documentary film)
(Amazon.com) In 1942, a secret U.S. military program was launched to recruit women to the war effort. But unlike the efforts to recruit Rosie the Riveter to the factory, this clandestine search targeted female mathematicians who would become human 'computers' for the U.S. Army. From the bombing of Axis Europe to the assaults on Japanese strongholds, women worked around-the-clock six days a week, creating ballistics tables that proved crucial to Allied success. Rosie made the weapons, but the female computers made them accurate. When the first electronic computer (ENIAC) was developed to aid the Army's calculation efforts, six of these women were tapped to become its first programmers.


YouTube Link:"Top Secret Rosies" Q & A @ WITI's 2011 Women Powering Technology Summit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u33_oRpAyEU&index=69&list=WL



A League of Their Own (feature film)
(All Movie Guide) Too sentimental by half, and at the same time completely disarming entertainment, Penny Marshall's film scores points for drawing attention to a chapter of sports history many people didn't even know existed. The baseball scenes are remarkably authentic-looking, and the production design is just right, without drawing too much unnecessary attention. Marshall has assembled a top-flight cast as well, with Geena Davis and Tom Hanks adding unlimited charisma to their wonderfully comic performances. The first hour is genuinely superb, briskly paced and filled with humorous vignettes. The second hour succumbs to syrupy bonding and overstates its emotions, but the film retains its good nature -- difficult to pass up as a worthy Hollywood confection. The film was a huge summer hit, and paid off with its casting of Davis, who stepped in after Debra Winger reportedly turned down the role (rumor has it she was turned off by the casting of Madonna in a supporting role). A failed TV series followed shortly after, but didn't create nearly as much buzz.





Life is Beautiful (feature film)
(All Movie Guide) Life is Beautiful caused more than a little controversy when it was released: any attempt to make comedy out of the Holocaust is going to inspire strong reactions from critics and audience members. Love it or loathe it, Life is Beautiful inarguably made an international star out of Italian comedian Roberto Benigni, who wrote, directed, and starred in it. One of his country's most celebrated comedians, Benigni was previously known for his work in numerous Italian comedies, as well as Johnny Stecchino and Jim Jarmusch's Down By Law and Night onEarthLife is Beautiful's Grand Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, followed by Benigni's Best Actor Oscar and acceptance speech (in exuberant, skillfully broken English), made Benigni possibly Italy's most famous export since the Fiat.
Although some viewers found the film's second half, set almost entirely in a concentration camp, to be well-meaning but misguided, the film's first half is indisputably enjoyable. Revolving around the courtship of an aristocratic lady nicknamed the Principessa by Benigni's Guido, it makes a refreshing, elegantly hilarious love story. Somewhat ironically, the film's wittiest and most accurate commentary on fascism and religious oppression is contained here, rather than in the concentration camp setting. Benigni's comedy here becomes a tool for side-splitting yet razor-sharp criticism, and this first section powerfully establishes the reality of everyday life disrupted by the war.

Saving Private Ryan (feature film)
(All Movie Guide) Saving Private Ryan marked another foray into World War II for Steven Spielberg, this time examining the soldiers' struggles to maintain their sense of mission even in situations that seemed to defy reason and hope. To show the carnage of the D-Day Omaha Beach landing, Spielberg used a barrage of sound and the unpolished immediacy of a hand-held camera to thrust the viewer into the conflict for a 24-minute sequence of relentless, random violence more intense than in any previous Hollywood war movie. The desaturated color further recalled WWII newsreel footage while rendering the blood a matter-of-fact part of the landscape.
Adapted from an incident recorded by historian Stephen E.Ambrose, the mission to save one man after the Normandy invasion becomes a means for Capt. Miller and his troop of WWII film archetypes to debate the sacrifices of war, even a "good" war. Critically hailed for its stunningly realistic battle sequences and heartfelt performances, the film became a summertime hit despite its realistic violence and serious subject. After winning several critics' prizes, Saving Private Ryan garnered 11 Academy Award nominations and won five, including Spielberg's second Oscar for Best Director and Janusz Kaminski for Best Cinematography.
Half Blood Blues by Esi Edugyan
(Powells.com) Berlin, 1939. The Hot Time Swingers, a popular jazz band, has been forbidden to play by the Nazis. Their young trumpet-player Hieronymus Falk, declared a musical genius by none other than Louis Armstrong, is arrested in a Paris cafe. He is never heard from again. He was twenty years old, a German citizen. And he was black.
Berlin, 1952. Falk is a jazz legend. Hot Time Swingers band members Sid Griffiths and Chip Jones, both African Americans from Baltimore, have appeared in a documentary about Falk. When they are invited to attend the film's premier, Sid's role in Falk's fate will be questioned and the two old musicians set off on a surprising and strange journey.
From the smoky bars of pre-war Berlin to the salons of Paris, Sid leads the reader through a fascinating, little-known world of jazz musicians during WWII as he describes the friendships, love affairs and treacheries that led to Falk's incarceration in Sachsenhausen. Half-Blood Blues is a story about music and race, love and loyalty, and the sacrifices we ask of ourselves, and demand of others, in the name of art.

What are YOU reading/watching/listening to?
Holley

Current Weather Conditions In Birmingham, AL

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